The Gibson Les Paul Guitar history down the years first sold by the Gibson Guitar Corporation in 1952

The Gibson Les Paul guitar – a solid body electric guitar that was first sold by the Gibson Guitar Corporation in 1952.

The Gibson Les Paul Guitar history down the years first sold by the Gibson Guitar Corporation in 1952

The Gibson Les Paul guitar designed by Gibson president Ted McCarty, factory manager John Huis and their team, along with guitarist/inventor Les Paul.

The Gibson Les Paul was originally offered with a gold finish and two P-90 pickups.

In 1957, humbucking pickups were added, along with sunburst finishes in 1958.

The sunburst 1958–1960 Les Paul today one of the best-known electric guitar types in the world was considered a failure, with low production and sales.

For 1961, the Les Paul was redesigned into what is now known as the Gibson SG.

A second Les Paul model was introduced in 1953, Called the Les Paul Custom, this black guitar with gold-plated hardware was dubbed the “Black Beauty”. Various bridge and tailpiece designs were added in 1953 and 1954, including the popular Tune-o-matic bridge.

The Goldtop and Custom models continued without significant changes until 1957.

In 1957, P-90 pickups were no longer offered on Les Paul guitars, new humbucker pickups designed by Seth Lover in 1955 were added to the Les Paul guitar in 1957.

This innovation in pickups became the flagship pickup design most associated with Gibson.

The post-1954 Les Paul guitar line included two models: the Standard (nicknamed the Goldtop), and the Custom (which offered gold hardware and a more formal black finish).

The Les Paul Custom features gold hardware, multilayer binding including the headstock, ebony fingerboard, real mother-of-pearl inlays and two or three-pickup layout.

1950s Customs were all-mahogany, rather than the mahogany-with-maple-cap of the Goldtop.

The original Customs were fitted with a P-90 pickup in the bridge position and an Alnico V “staple” pickup in the neck. In 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new PAF humbucker pickups, and later became available with three pickups instead of the usual two.

The traditional Les Paul Custom was discontinued in 1961 and its name transferred to the custom version of the then-new Gibson SG.

In 1968, Gibson reintroduced the Les Paul Custom as a two-pickup-only model.

The headstock angle was changed from 17 degrees to 14, and a wider headstock and a maple top were added.

White and two sunburst finish options were added to the color palette in 1974, also new in 1974 was the optional TP-6 fine-tuner tailpiece, allowing for micro-adjustment of string tuning from the bridge.

The mahogany neck was replaced with a three-piece maple neck in 1975 with this change lasting till around 1982.

Popular colors, such as wine red and “silverburst,” were added in the 1970s and ’80s

In 1954, the Les Paul Junior debuted, targeted the beginning or student guitarist. The Junior is characterized by its flat-top “slab” mahogany body, finished in sunburst. It had a single P-90 pickup, simple volume and tone controls, an unbound rosewood fingerboard with plain dot-shape position markers, and a combination bridge/tailpiece unit similar to the Goldtop.

In 1955, Gibson launched the Les Paul TV model, which was identical to the Junior except for the name and a fashionable contemporary “limed oak” style finish, later more accurately named “limed mahogany”. This natural wood finish with white grain filler often aged into a natural wood or dull yellow appearance, and eventually evolved into the opaque mustard yellow, popularly called “TV yellow”. The model was not, as a popular myth says, to avoid glare from old TV cameras, but a modern look and a name to promote “The Les Paul & Mary Ford Show” then on television.

Gibson made a radical design change to their Junior and TV models in 1958: to accommodate player requests for more access to the top frets than the previous designs allowed, these electric guitar models were revamped with a new double-cutaway body shape. In addition, Juniors were now available with a cherry red finish, while the re-shaped TV adopted a more yellow-tinged finish.

The Gibson Les Paul Special was released in 1955, featuring a slab body, two soapbar P-90 single coil pickups, and was finished in a color similar to TV Yellow (but not called a TV model).

In 1959, the Special was given the same new double-cutaway body shape as the Junior and the TV received in 1958. Around this time, Les Paul decided to discontinue his affiliation with Gibson; the model was renamed “SG Special” in late 1959. However, when the new design was applied to the two-pickup Special, the cavity for the neck pickup overlapped the neck-to-body joint. This weakened the joint to the point that the neck could break after only moderate handling. The problem was soon resolved when Gibson designers moved the neck pickup farther down the body, producing a stronger joint and eliminating the breakage problem.

In 1960, Gibson experienced a decline in electric guitar sales due to strong competition from Fender’s comparable but much lighter double-cutaway design, the Stratocaster. In response, Gibson modified the Les Paul line. For 1961, the Les Paul was thinner and much lighter than earlier models, with two sharply pointed cutaways and a vibrato system. However, the redesign was done without Les Paul’s knowledge, and he hated the design, so he asked Gibson to remove his name. The single cutaway designed retained the “Les Paul” name until 1963 when Les Paul’s endorsement deal with Gibson ended. Without a contract, Gibson could no longer call its guitars “Les Pauls’, and it renamed them “SGs” (for “Solid Guitars”).

The Deluxe was among the “new” 1968 Les Pauls. This model featured “mini-humbuckers”, also known as “New York” humbuckers, and did not initially prove popular. The mini-humbucker pickup fit into the pre-carved P-90 pickup cavity using an adaptor ring developed by Gibson in order to use a surplus supply of Epiphone mini-humbuckers. The Deluxe was introduced in late 1968 and helped to standardize production among Gibson’s U.S.-built Les Pauls. The first incarnation of the Deluxe featured a one-piece body and slim three-piece neck. The multipiece body (a thin layer of maple on top of two layers of Honduran mahogany) arrived in 1969. In late 1969, a reinforcing neck volute was added. 1969 Deluxes feature the Gibson logo devoid of the dot over the “i” in Gibson. By late 1969/early 1970, the dot over the “i” had returned, plus a “Made In USA” stamp on the back of the headstock. The Deluxe could be specially-ordered with full-size humbucker pickups; such full size versions of the Deluxe were “Standard” spec. By 1975, the neck construction was changed from mahogany to maple, until the early 1980s, when the construction was returned to mahogany. The body changed back to solid mahogany from the pancake design in late 1976 or early 1977.

In 1978, the Gibson Les Paul Pro Deluxe was introduced. This guitar featured P-90 pickups instead of the “mini-humbuckers” of the Deluxe model, an ebony fingerboard, maple neck, mahogany body and chrome hardware. It came in ebony, cherry sunburst, tobacco sunburst or gold finish. It was discontinued in 1983.

The Gibson Dark Fire, a variant of the Gibson Les Paul, was an electric solid body guitar produced by Gibson Guitar Corporation. It was a second generation Robot Guitar, using an updated version of the Powertune self-tuning system produced by Tronical Gmbh. The Dark Fire also introduced Gibson’s Chameleon Tone Technology, a system consisting of onboard electronics designed to simulate various guitar tones. Additionally, the guitar included an audio interface called the Robot Interface Pack or RIP.

The Studio model was introduced in 1983, and is still in production. The guitar is intended for the studio musician; therefore, the design features of the “Les Paul Studio” are centered on optimal sound output and not on flashy appearance. This model retains only the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contribute to tone and playability, including the carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware. However, the Studio design omits several stock Gibson ornamentations that do not affect sound quality, including body/neck binding. The first Studios from 1983 to 1986 were made with alder bodies rather than mahogany/maple. The current Studios come with a chambered mahogany body with either a maple or mahogany cap. The entry level Les Paul Studio “faded” has a weight relieved mahogany body and top and a satin finish.

Gibson also offered the Studio in a “standard” model, This variant was adorned with neck and body binding, ebony fretboard and sunburst paint job.

All Studios at the time had dot fretboard markers and a thinner body.

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